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Glad you're here. I write from a faith-based perspective about creativity, work, family, and what not.

Our Fast-Paced Life is Choking Our Souls

Our Fast-Paced Life is Choking Our Souls

God never hurries. There are no deadlines against which he must work. Only to know this is to quiet our spirits and relax our nerves.
— AW Tozer

I probably check my email a billion times a day. These little electronic parcels provide a dopamine rush akin to the effects of cocaine. It's like a tether to a world of stimulus and activity. If I'm not busy, I feel guilty. I know I'm not alone, because I hear people talk about it all the time. We are a culture obsessed with "the grind" and "hustle" and what not. This is generally a good thing - sure man, work hard - but it has become a religion.

Our busyness is, at its root, a theological problem. We are deluded into thinking that we are more important than we actually are. If we don't get such and such done, the world will unravel and our kids will lick the underside of park benches. We think we're a big deal, and we would never say it - or perhaps even recognize it - but we want to be God. 

That's the root of sin - to want to be God and to control everything. We will do whatever we can to show that we're powerful, even if only to ourselves. That's what happened in The Garden and it's the root of all of the moral decay and depravity in our world. 

Say it with me: I'm not that important. It's okay, snowflake, because you actually are important - but just not as important as you make yourself out to be. Let's say it another way - you are valuable. God made you, this impossibly complex cocktail of DNA, into who you are. You matter more than you will ever know. 

But the world doesn't rest on your shoulders.

That's really good news, because if it did, we'd be doomed. You don't want the world to depend upon me and I don't want it to depend upon you. 

Did Jesus strike you as being in a hurry, or did he strike you as being self-assured? He had a lot of work to do, didn't he? He could have had an Outlook calendar with more colors than the rainbow. But in no story in the New Testament do I see Jesus as hurried. The salvation of the world literally rested upon him, yet he was not freaked out. Why? He knew he came from perfect harmony within the Godhead (Father, Son, Holy Spirit) and he knew that's where he would return. He had hope - and assurance of - a bright future. 

One more thing. Nearly everything of value takes time. Building relationships takes time. Obtaining wisdom takes time. Getting strong takes time. Success takes time. We want everything right now but the things we can get right now probably aren't that valuable. We must reorient our souls toward the long game, and by long I mean eternity.

We have the same assurance that bolstered Jesus during his painfully difficult time on earth. If we are in Christ, we are God's children and while right now might hurt, soon it won't - and it never will again thereafter. Our lives here matter because we are valued and because we do indeed have valuable work to do. But we aren't called to fix everything and everyone in our path. We're called to momentary faithfulness in the joyful light of what Jesus has done.

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