IMG_2356.JPG

a voice crying out in the postmodern wilderness

He is Unsearchable, Yet Knowable

He is Unsearchable, Yet Knowable

(The following is a repost from my weekly devotional, Sundays Into Mondays. If you enjoyed this post, head here to sign up for Sundays Into Mondays.)

For my thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways, declares the Lord. For as the heavens are higher than the earth, so are my ways higher than your ways and my thoughts than your thoughts.
(Isaiah 55:8-9)

 

Have you ever been hiking and found that the trail just seems to disappear? You follow the worn path, finding comfort in the tracks of those gone before you and then suddenly the trail vanishes. You are in the woods—perhaps on the side of a mountain—and all you can do is stop and look around.

Theology is like that.

Theology is crucial. To search the Scriptures and think deeply about who God is and how he works is absolutely essential to the life of believers. I am a huge fan of theology. But we must understand the limitations of it. The goal of healthy theology is to illuminate the glory of God by searching out who he is. Too often, though, it seems theologians (or armchair theologians) think the goal is to figure God out completely.

I bid them good luck.

The Word of God tells us everything we need to know about God, and we can certainly deduce theological doctrines from the text, but the Word of God doesn't tell us everything about God. His ways are far beyond our comprehension. His power and glory and moral perfection is hard for inglorious and immoral people to grasp. 

Does that mean he isn't knowable? Does that mean we should be intellectually lazy about him? By no means!

We exist to, as John Piper says, glorify God by enjoying him forever. And how do we enjoy God? By pursuing him with our hearts, souls, and yes—our minds. We should study the Scriptures, read theological writings, and search out the unsearchable. Because the truth of the matter is that when the trail runs out, it isn't a dead end—it's a meadow where we can lie down in the presence of our God.

Our God is knowable, and he is here.

The Danger of Overgeneralization

The Danger of Overgeneralization

How Billy Graham and C.S. Lewis Responded to Their Doubts

How Billy Graham and C.S. Lewis Responded to Their Doubts